Almoxarifado

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Arne Svenson. Prisoners.

In this exhibition, Arne Svenson presents some two dozen portraits of turn-of-the-century prisoners, which the artist developed from found negatives. Each image (about one to two feet) is a diptych mug-shot (full face and profile), with the criminal’s name and crime etched into the emulsion and visible above the subject’s head. The crimes range from petty larceny to murder. Various ages, races and both sexes are included, although only one female convict, Charlotte Hayes, appears in the show.

This group of works was developed from old glass negatives that Svenson found rotting away in the musty warehouse of an antiques dealer in Petaluma, Ca. The artist acquired nearly 1,500 negatives and, with the help of his sister Kristina, cleaned and restored many of them. After intensive research in the libraries and courthouse archives of the Sacramento Valley area, Svenson discovered that the photos were taken to chronicle municipal felons during 1900-1908 by Clara Smith, a photographer under contract of the town of Marysville, Ca. Svenson also uncovered fairly extensive material describing the convicts’ crimes.

hatedbyyall:

My next tattoo I think. I pulled it from a google search. A sailor Jerry inspired piece.

hatedbyyall:

My next tattoo I think. I pulled it from a google search. A sailor Jerry inspired piece.

Lúcio Paes
Trabalho autoral. Caneta nanquim sobre papel.

Lúcio Paes

Trabalho autoral. Caneta nanquim sobre papel.

likeafieldmouse:

Jack Kerouac’s On the Road

“Using a manual typewriter in a New York City loft, Jack Kerouac produced the original manuscript of On the Road during a three-week period in the spring of 1951.

Kerouac produced the continuous scroll by taping pages of semi-translucent paper together to feed the typewriter and write without interruption.

The text is single-spaced, without paragraphs, and edited in pencil by Kerouac.”